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SLEEP

PARENTS' PERSPECTIVE

As parents, we love when the kids go to bed. Most of us don't consider the regenerative function of sleep, the growth that occurs during sleep, or cognitive effects of a lack of sleep. But we do consider the quiet of the house after the kids are in bed!

KIDS' POINT OF VIEW

I don't know of ANY young kids that want to go to sleep. "Come on, dad, gimme 5 more minutes." "Let me watch the end of this show." "I'm almost done with the game." 

 

If they only knew how much smarter (cognitive regeneration), faster (rejuvenated muscles), and quicker (better motor neuron firing) they are after a good night's sleep, our houses may be a little quieter, a little earlier each night.  

INFORMATION BELOW

COACH'S PERSPECTIVE

We, as coaches, know there isn't enough time in the day to read scouting reports, prepare game plans or practice plans. However, these rules of sleep apply to us, too.

REASONS FOR SLEEP

1. Sleep promotes growth

2. Sleep helps the heart

3. Sleep affects weight

4. Sleep helps beat germs

5. Sleep reduces injury risk

6. Sleep increases kids' attention span

7. Sleep boosts learning

Follow the link for an article from the

Parents online magazine for more information. 

VIDEOS!

Because these people are smarter than me, here are a few videos to explain why we need sleep. 

SMART

REALLY SMART

According to the Sleep Foundation , children aged six to 13 need 9-11 hours of sleep. At the same time, there is an increasing demand on their time from school (e.g., homework), sports and other extracurricular and social activities. In addition, school-aged children become more interested in TV, computers, the media, and the Internet as well as caffeine products – all of which can lead to difficulty falling asleep, nightmares and disruptions to their sleep. In particular, watching TV close to bedtime has been associated with bedtime resistance, difficulty falling asleep, anxiety around sleep and sleeping fewer hours. Sleep problems and disorders are prevalent at this age. Poor or inadequate sleep can lead to mood swings, behavioral problems such as ADHD and cognitive problems that impact their ability to learn in school. 

Sleep Tips for School-aged Children

  • Teach school-aged children about healthy sleep habits

  • Continue to emphasize the need for regular and consistent sleep schedule and bedtime routine (even on the weekends)

  • Make child's bedroom conducive to sleep – dark, cool and quiet

  • Keep TV and computers out of the bedroom

  • Avoid caffeine

TEDMED SMART

WHY SCHOOL STARTS TOO EARLY

CIRCADIAN NEUROSCIENTIST SMART

MANIPULATE YOUR SLEEP

TIPS FOR GOOD SLEEP

TIPS FOR GOOD SLEEP

HOW TO SLEEP BETTER